answers about Cauda Equina Syndrome

Disclaimers:

***Material on this Website is provided for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for medical care, rehabilitation, educational consultation, or legal consultation. This Website contains general information which may or may not apply to individuals. This Website can not and does not address each individual’s situation and needs. I encourage all persons with chronic illness, their family members and concerned parties to seek professional advice for any specific questions and concerns. I have made every effort to insure that content is accurate, correct and current and am not liable for any unintentional errors. Links to other Websites and contacts have been carefully chosen, but do not imply endorsement and I am not responsible or liable for their information and contents. Under no circumstances, shall the authors and publishers be liable under any theory of recovery for any damages arising out of or in any manner connected with the use of information, services, or documents from the site.***

The information in midnightdemon is not intended to substitute for medical professional advice but is to be used only as an aid in understanding this condition. This site is not maintained by physicians. No medical decision should be made based on information in this site. A physician should always be consulted for any health problem or medical condition. This site is a compilation of CES patients’ thoughts, ideas and discussions, which we hope you will find useful, but it is not medical advice.

My doctor is an idiot at times, especially when it comes to treating CES. He thinks that because I have no back pain, I should be ok. What he doesn’t realize is the damage is in my foot/ankle and that is what is causing me the most pain.

WHAT IS CES?

The syndrome arises through nerve damage to the cauda equina, the horse’s tail of nerves that come after the spinal cord.

There is a specific pattern:

Severe pain in radicular (nerve root) pattern: back, buttocks, perineum(saddle area), genitalia, thighs, legs.


Loss of sensation: often tingling or numbness in the saddle area.


Weakness: in legs, often asymmetric (one side)


Bladder/bowel/sexual dysfunction: incontinence / retention of urine; incontinence of feces; impotence/loss of ejaculation or orgasm


Loss of reflexes: knee/ankle reflexes may be diminished, as may anal and bulbocavernosus. (a muscle of the perineum, the area between the anus and the genitals)

Any of these symptoms arising suddenly is a medical emergency and should be treated as such. These are the red flags of CES. You do not need ALL of these symptoms to have a case of CES. Any compression of the Cauda Equina nerves (shown through an MRI) IS CES!

I have had CES, Cauda Equina Syndrome, for the past 12.5 years. In the first few months it was difficult. I didn’t have supportive people in my life I could go to because there was no one I could find that knew what CES was. Recovery was slow. Painfully slow. It took almost a week till I was able to move the toes on my foot after surgery. It took almost three months to learn to walk with just a cane. Luckily the first go round did not affect my bowels or bladder. I had some retention of the bladder but this was thought to stem from my use of opioid medication. My surgery was at the L4/L5 level on the left side.

My second surgery (yes you can get CES twice) was at the L2/L3 level and it really caused me to become disabled five years later. At first my left leg was affected and still is. I still get nerve pain in my thigh at times, especially if I sit too long. My ankle/foot is another matter.

When I first got CES, I fell and sprained my left ankle while it was numb. Because I had no sensation in my foot/ankle I didn’t realize the extent of the damage until feeling came back, weeks later. Then I resprained my ankle in 2010 and again in 2011. This invariably lead to a condition known as CRPS (complex regional pain syndrome).

I have what I term CES-Lite. I didn’t have the textbook case of CES, where you lose function of your bowels and bladder, sexual function, weakness in one leg or both, loss of sensation in the saddle area, etc. I just had leg and back pain. My CES was caught within the 24-48 hour window. Anything greater than that risks permanent nerve damage.

It is possible to recover from CES. You just have to give yourself a LOT of time and perseverance. What one goes through is not going to be the same for another, even if they have had the same surgery at the same level. It is possible to walk again but you need to work hard at it. Going to a physical therapist that has had nerve damage experience is very helpful. Typical recovery time is anywhere from 9 months to two years or longer. It all depends on the circumstances the individual has faced and if the surgery itself didn’t cause more damage. This is all my opinion and I am not a medical professional. I am just writing this to inform those that come to my site looking for answers to these questions.

See my page about CES 101 to help with nerve pain and other complications from CES.